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Boot Camp Year-End Report

Book Elves Boot Camp got off to a great start this year in May with a RISE Austin session featuring Thomas Umstattd, Jr. revealing secrets to an amazing author website. Throughout the year we were honored to have such knowledgeable speakers as Stephanie Barko, David Fried, Jenny Magic, Joey McGirr and Lynn Scheurell cover a wide variety of topics to help writers  identify their target reader, navigate the editing process, effectively market their book and much more.

As we look forward to 2014, we have decided to transition from local workshops to online formats such as webinars, podcasts and videos in an effort to expand our reach and provide the wealth of knowledge and insight of our partners to a much larger audience. We are very excited about what lies ahead and can’t wait to get our little hands dirty to make make it all happen for you, our clients and friends.

Be watching for lots of new things in the coming months as we get up to our elfin elbows in a more multimedia approach to bringing you even more knowledge and information about bringing your message to the world.

Subscribe to the Book Elves Newsletter to stay up to date on all the new cool stuff that will be coming from the Elves.

Thank you for a great 2013. Here’s to an even more amazing 2014!

How to Talk So Your Target Audience Will Listen

By: Jenny Magic

Struggling with what to say on your blog or social media sites? Have you made all the “new product” announcements but you’re still lacking followers and fans? Here are a few tips.

Turn off your “radio voice”

Have you ever listened to NPR radio announcers and imagined them walking around their normal lives talking like that? “Honey, we’re out of mustard” in that deep, formal baritone? Not only would it seem awkward and fake, but it would also be pretty distracting.

The same is true for content marketing, and we’re seeing companies of all sizes struggle with this as online media evolves. Traditional, one-way media channels like television, radio and print are more suited to the formal tones of broadcast. In the old days, a credible, omniscient, father-figure advised you on your consumer choices.

Times have changed.  Social media is conversation, and a “radio voice” sticks out like a sore thumb.

Turn off the formality and talk to your audience as individuals.  Have a regular conversation with them. Not only will your message sound more authentic, but the conversational tone will encourage a conversational response.

As an example, if you were marketing your restaurant, you could say that you specialize in “Combining local seasonal ingre­di­ents with an infinite spec­trum of flavors from around the globe as the basis for our culi­nary philos­ophy.” I took that almost verbatim from a restaurant website.

But to “turn off the radio voice,” you might try the style of one of my favorite Austin, Texas spots, Magnolia Cafe, and use more casual language and a little personality: “Welcome to Magnolia Cafe! Fresh food cooked with passion in a comfortable setting, kind of like your favorite aunt’s giant kitchen, if she had one. Open 24/8.”

If you use language and tone like your readers would use in everyday language, your message is more likely to be heard, remembered and repeated.

“Hey you!” Talk to them directly

Have you ever been at a noisy coffee shop – ignoring all the talking around you – when someone says your name?  Your ears perk up, and suddenly you’re looking around and listening to find out if it is a coincidence or if someone you know is trying to get your attention.

You weren’t listening until you thought someone was talking directly to you.

The same thing is true in every communication situation, especially in the cluttered world of the Internet. As users visit websites and search for products and services, they tend to ignore general messages that could be targeted at anyone. Instead, they hone in on the messages that seem designed for them.

That’s why shampoo ads don’t just say, “Get clean hair!” but instead have messages like, “Hey there, do you have dry/ frizzy/ unmanageable hair? Have we got the shampoo for you!”

Information that tries to be helpful to everyone is likely too generic to be interesting to anyone.

The more you can say, “Hey, you!” to your target audience, the more likely they will listen to what you say next.  Much like the person saying your name in the coffee shop to get your attention, using descriptors in your marketing messages that your audience will recognize in themselves will get their attention.

So instead of just posting blog tips about “10 Things Every Business Owner Should Know,” consider addressing a very specific issue: “Having Trouble Finding the Right WordPress Plugins? Top 10 Plugins for Small Businesses.” If someone has recently fought that battle, your headline will jump off the page for them.

Get to know them

Consider what you don’t know about your target audience, their goals, desires and habits, and ASK. Ask about things that aren’t directly relevant to selling your product or service. Ask the kind of “get to know you” questions you would ask in a real life introduction.  Choose topics that are interesting for your market research, but also ask the questions because you just want to know your audience better. Companies that use social media to show they understand and care about the audience they serve are the ones that get attention, get fans, and get passed along because they’re trying to make a genuine connection rather than just sell.

You could ask which blogs or Twitter users they think are the best in a certain category. You might have them rank the top events or conferences in your field, or get their opinions on your next product or logo update like Simple Shoes did.

Zappos recently posted on Facebook, “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood debuted on this day back in 1968. We know you have the theme song in your head now. What was your favorite television show growing up?” Not at all related to selling shoes, but 165 fans took the time to give Zappos their answer.

Even if your intention is just fostering interaction, you’ll often get valuable insights to help you build out your target audience persona.

Any communication book will tell you that using simple language, talking about topics that interest your listener and asking questions are all key to building understanding and rapport. Don’t forget to apply the same principles to your marketing messages!

What other tips do you have to better connect with your audience?

__________

Jenny L. Magic (@JennyLMagic) is the founder and principal of Better Way to Say It, a content strategy company that has been helping clients identify their target audience and write content that captivates since 2008. Jenny speaks regularly at marketing events and workshops, and teaches courses in content marketing for the University of San Diego Institute for Sales and Business Development. She is a contributor to the Content Marketing Institute, VP of Development Association of Women in Communication, Austin, and her professional background includes Google Certified AdWords expertise, Inbound Marketing Professional Certification and a certificate in Direct Marketing from the DMA.